Chrome, JavaScript, mobile, webdev

Make Your Site Faster

We know that users prefer websites and applications that work fast. There is a lot of evidence that link performance to revenue. Let’s see what are main parts of the user experience that relate to the perception of ‘speed’ and how we can improve it.

RAIL performance model

RAIL is a user-centric performance model. Every web app has these four distinct aspects to its life cycle, and performance fits into them in very different ways. You can see in the image below the 4 main aspects and what are the time limits to each stage.

The RAIL model for performance

The TL;DR

  • Focus on the user – the end goal isn’t to make your site perform fast on any specific device, it’s to ultimately make users happy.
  • Respond to users immediately  acknowledge user input in under 100ms – In mobile always use touch events and not click events (yep, click events still got this 300ms delay on mobile browsers)
  • Render each frame in under 16ms and aim for consistency. Users notice “jank” because in most cases it will ‘jump’ to their eyes.
  • Keep users engaged – deliver interactive content in under 1000ms.

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Chrome, HTML5, JavaScript, mobile, webdev

Make Your Web Forms More Efficient

Ido's payment formForms are the main ‘entry barrier’ to anything meaningful on the web. It might be a registration form, sign-up form or a shopping cart. In all of them, you wish to do the best in order to delight your users and lower the friction.
In the slides below, we will cover the best practices so your forms will rock.

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Chrome, JavaScript, mobile, webdev

The Latest From The Web

google-chrome-logoA lot of new interesting APIs that are pushing the web platform forward introduced with Chrome 43 (now in Stable). Let see the ones that are going to impact a lot of users.

  • The Fetch API now allows developers to directly operate on and incrementally release the bytes of streamed network responses, in contrast to the equivalent XMLHttpRequest functionality that requires developers keep the entire in-progress stream response in memory.
  • The Cache Storage API, previously only available in service workers, now provides developers full imperative control over their caching in the page context. This is huge! It will enable users to have better (=faster) experience in places where the connections are not good.
  • Autofill and Autocomplete – People hate filling out web forms, especially on mobile devices, learn how to help them complete it up to 30% faster. (And yes! I wrote it).

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Chrome, mobile

Google Now On Chromebook

Screenshot 2015-04-24 14.50.35

“Google Now” got a powerful goal: The right information at the right time.
From knowing the weather before you go for a run, to planning the best route to avoid traffic, or even checking your favorite team’s score while they are playing, get the information you want, when you need it. You can look at it as a new phase in Search. You are getting the answers before you had the chance to ask the questions. If you use Android or iPhone – Good chances that you saw it in action. However, if you got a Chromebook, here is how you can manage it and sync between your phone and your laptop. Yesterday, Google has announced that they’re expanding Now with support for 70 new apps, including Spotify, Feedly, Runkeeper, OpenTable etc’.

How Google Now is working in Chrome? Continue reading

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Chrome, JavaScript, mobile, webdev

Physical Web On Mobile

Physical Web is the new approach to unleash the core superpower of the web: interaction on demand.
People should be able to walk up to any smart device, think on classic cases like: a vending machine, an art item, a poster, a toy, a bus stop, a rental car – and not have to download an app first. They should be able to just tap and interact with them.

forest in the morning

The Physical Web is not shipping yet nor is it a Google product. This is an early-stage experimental project and we’re developing it out in the open as we do all things related to the web. This should only be of interest to developers looking to test out this feature and provide feedback. The Physical Web is an effort to extend the core superpower of the web – the URL – to everyday physical objects. The user experience of smart objects should be much like links in a web browser: i.e., just tap and use. At its base, the Physical Web is a discovery service: a smart object broadcasts relevant URLs that any nearby device can receive.
This simple capability can unlock exciting new ways to interact with the Web. Continue reading

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Chrome, Design, HTML5, mobile, webdev

Mobile Web For Mobile World


chrome_front-androidHere are the slides from a talk I gave at Campus TLV to developers from the government. It’s clear that mobile is growing very fast and you must have a quality present on mobile devices. You wish your site (and apps) to be ‘mobile first’ and make sure they are using the best practices for mobile.
It’s important to remember that E-commerce occurs across apps and web, but consumers rely disproportionately on mobile web for commercial tasks. In these slides, we will see how to improve your sites or applications. Btw, if you wish to read this information in Hebrew, you can find it over at DevHeb.com Continue reading

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Chrome, mobile, webdev

A List Of Great Mobile Web Apps

mwa-examples 2014-08-21 14.16.36In the past, I gave few presentations on ‘Modern web apps‘ and each time I tried to show compelling examples.

Here is a new source (mobile web apps ftw) that might help you see what can be done (today) on the mobile web.
Few good examples to checkout:

  1. Weather App
  2. Lanyrd (For your next conferences).
  3. Stanford
  4. Financial Times
  5. Alerts in Israel (hebrew)
  6. Time Tracker (hebrew)
  7. GitHub
  8. Twitter
  9. Gmail

Another good site to get insperation is: mobile-patterns.com
If you have other great suggestions – please use the comments and I’ll add them.

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