Chrome

Events With Google Analytics

GA icon for events

One of the useful features of Google Analytics is the ability to track specific events. It gives you insight into how users filled your forms or on which buttons they clicked inside the video player. You are getting into the world of measuring actions inside your pages and not just between them. In the demo below we will see how to track a ‘download’ button click event and how to track the form filling. It’s super useful when you wish to learn if users use the Autofill feature with your forms.
It’s an easy API that you should leverage, so let’s jump into it.

What?

Events (in our world of Google analytics) are user interactions with content that can be tracked independently from a web page or a screen load. Downloads, mobile ad clicks, gadgets, forms, embedded elements and video plays are all examples of actions you might want to track as Events.

Implementation

Event hits can be sent using the send command and specifying a hitType of an event.
The send command has the following signature for the event hit type:

ga('send', 'event', 
   [eventCategory], [eventAction], 
   [eventLabel], [eventValue], 
   [fieldsObject]);

You need to make sure to add the GA script tag to your page.
Something similar to: Continue reading

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Chrome

Web Forms Checklist

web forms checklist

In our Udacity course “Building High Conversion Web Forms” we talk a lot on how to think on the friction that forms create and what to do in order to smooth it. One of the outcomes from our source was this checklist that you can use in order to make sure you are on the right path. In this post, I will cover the first 2 topics: form design and inputs types. In the future, I’ll cover validation and touch.

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Chrome

Password Forms That Browsers Love

login form example

There are two types of common forms that you see every day on (almost) every website: Sign-up and Sign-in. If you want to improve your users experience and allow them to fill these forms quickly and efficiently, this post is for you.

You can help ensure that browsers’ password management functionality can understand your site’s sign-up, sign-in. All it take is a ‘touch’ of a change for your password forms by enriching your HTML with a bit of metadata.

Here are the rules to follow: Continue reading

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Chrome, Design

Design Better Forms

25%-metric-on-formsTL;DR

Make your forms as short as possible. The best form is no form. If you must have ‘few’ fields, make sure you optimized for Autofill with the right autocomplete attributes. As you can see in the image above, it’s moving the needle, for real.
Now, if you have another 4 minutes, here are few points to think while you are designing you next form. Continue reading

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Chrome, HTML5, JavaScript, mobile, webdev

Make Your Web Forms More Efficient

Ido's payment formForms are the main ‘entry barrier’ to anything meaningful on the web. It might be a registration form, sign-up form or a shopping cart. In all of them, you wish to do the best in order to delight your users and lower the friction.
In the slides below, we will cover the best practices so your forms will rock.

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