Business, Chrome

Auto Complete Attribute Will Improve Your Profit (And Forms)

Hands full (with grapes)

Autofill in Chrome

Chrome has a great new Autofill feature that as a developer you’ll want to add to your websites for Chrome to use. Other browsers are sure to follow too. The first time you fill out a form, Chrome automatically saves the contact information that you enter, like your name, address, phone number, or email address, as an Autofill entry. You can store multiple addresses as separate entries. Moreover, Chrome can save your credit card information, with your explicit permission. When you enter credit card information on a form, Google Chrome asks you at the top of the page whether you’d like to save the information. Click “Save info” if you’d like the credit card to be saved as an Autofill entry.

Later, when you start filling out a form, the Autofill entries that match what you’re typing will appear in a menu. Select an entry to automatically complete the form with information from the entry. Chrome also saves the text you’ve typed in specific form fields. The next time you fill out the same field, text that you’ve typed in the past appears in a menu. Just select the text you want to use from the menu to insert it directly into the field.

In Chrome, you get a full support for the autocomplete attributes . All we need to do is to make sure we are leveraging them. You will improve your checkout process and make your users 6.73 times happier. Since autocomplete is part of the standard (WHATWG HTML) you know that other browsers will support it as well.

The autocomplete attributes can be accompanied with a section name, such as:

  • shipping given-name
  • billing street-address

This is recommended because it will make your form easier to understand and fill. The browser will auto complete different sections separately, and not as a continuous form.
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Business, Chrome

Web Monetization Options

TL;DR

Today there are many choices when it comes to make money on the web.

  • In-app payments – There are many examples to an application that is free but let you add features with in-app payments. A good example is a game that is free, but offers additional levels or virtual goods for a certain price.
  • One-time charge – You charge a fixed price for your application. It could be before the user tries it or after a period of ‘testing’.
  • Subscription – There could be monthly or yearly subscription models. Users will pay as they go. Many SMB applications are working this way.
  • Freemium – In this pricing strategy we can use each of the previous options. The advantage in it is that we are offering a limited trial version of our app so users could ‘test before they buy’ and offer a ‘pro version’ for those who wish to buy the full application.
  • Ads – There are many options and we will cover it in the future.

Google Wallet on all devices

Let’s take a closer look at each option and see when and how to use it. Continue reading

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Chrome, cloud, webdev

What’s New In Google Developers World

Here are my slides from a talk I gave last week on what’s new and available for you as a developer in Google’s world. This talk gives a high level overview on the main APIs. If you wish to dive deeper on some of them, you will find many links in the slides.

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