Business, life

Decisions And Intuition – Daniel Kahneman

Psychologist and Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman reveals the actions we can take to overcome the biases. He talks in this podcast about the things that cripple our decision-making, damper our thinking, and limit our effectiveness.

Some gems from his conversion:

First one, is thought provoking as you take it to your personal or professional life.

“I think changing behavior is extremely difficult. There are a few guidelines about how to do that, but anybody who’s very optimistic about changing behavior is just deluded.”

The second is about incentives and it’s putting more light to Charlie’s perceptions.

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Business, cloud

Market Trends Talk – swampUp 2019

The world has many buzzwords that people like to use. Some are more relevant to the real world and some aren’t. If yesterday was powered by new products and features, today is going to be filled by insights from our communities.

There are around 37 million developers in the world (according to GitHub last report) so it’s a substantial community. Moreover, DevOps is growing at a rapid pace. Btw, according to StackOverflow last survey – DevOps developers and site reliability engineers are among the highest paid, most experienced developers most satisfied with their jobs, and are looking for new jobs at the lowest levels.

I think we can all agree that data is stronger than opinions, rights?
This is what I really like about the special point of view that we have at JFrog. As the “database of DevOps“, we are sitting in a unique place – holding the output of what developers producing.
This is giving us excellent visibility into trends and the real world.

What does this mean?

It’s about contrasting perception with reality.
We combined our own data from 5000 customers with internal and external researches in an effort to give you a clear picture of the current state and what are the DevOps trends for the next 12-18 months.

The main challenges

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Business

A Trip To TRANSFORM!2019

Make your software flow

Last week I had the pleasure to participate in a panel that talked about the future of DevOps. It was part of Transform!2019 Event that was in Munich, Germany. Fun fact, from the hotel I could see the Google office, which brought many good memories.

The main goal of the event was to let participants a way to experience what it means to change a company to become more “Intelligent”. The way to share the knowledge was by engaging in an open dialogue between industry leaders, start-ups in the DevOps world, executives and SAP experts. The event had few tracks and many options to network which was a great opportunity to learn from others.

DevOps Panel

When it comes to creating a business that can thrive in the digital age, the benefits of DevOps are clear. Faster deployment frequency and lower failure rates are proven to be some of the advantages of DevOps adoption. It brings more velocity into your (software) organization and enables you to add more value (faster) to your users.

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Business

Charlie’s Thoughts on Decision Making

I read a few years ago the Poor Charlie’s Almanack and found it to be a really great book for many areas in life. It’s also a long and heavy book so you might wish to get it it to your Kindle. Charles Munger is a brilliant thinker and it’s no surprise that the book is full of practical wisdom.

Some of the points I took and used many times:

Incentives – He talks about the incentives and how they are in the root of many systems. One of the more powerful statements is: “If you wish to see what people will do – look at their incentives”. It holds true both to people and to teams & companies.

Bias – How the human mind is closing itself after it ‘knows’ something. That might be really hard when you want to change your thoughts on a topic. You should embrace people who think differently and aren’t agree with you on every topic. It’s not easy but rewarding and will improve your decisions. Continue reading

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Business, life

Make Better Decisions

The lake and clouds near HWY 92&280

Thanks to @farnamstreet for these great points that he posted on Twitter. It reminded me of a good conversation I had with a friend about the ‘right’ decision and a ‘good’ decision.

A good decision is the best decision you can make based on the evidence at hand at the moment you need to decide. If it will be the ‘right’ one – only time can tell. Btw, it is good to remember that many decisions are reversible. With those types of decisions, you can use a light-weight process. You don’t have to live with the consequences for that long if you can change it (which is easy to say and hard to do). You should improve your skills to recognize quickly that a decision is wrong. When you become good at course correction, you will be able to ‘fail quickly’ and move forward fast. If you wish to get better and increase the odds to have good decisions that turn out on the right side, here is a list of rules to help with the process.

How to take a better decision?

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Business

Make Your Meetings Better

Empty meeting

In the past I’ve wrote about status meetings and why you should avoid them. As a basic productivity rule, you should replace meetings when emails or calls will do.

But there are many cases, where you wish to have a meeting in order to: brainstorm, inform, decide etc’.

How can you make it more productive? Continue reading

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Business, life

Weapons Of Math Destructions

Weapons Of Math Destructions book

 

I have just finished this book “Weapons Of Math Destructions” by Cathy O’neil.

It’s an important book that deal with mathematical algorithms and models that control our modern life and where they threat to change many aspects of our social interactions. Think about cases like who is being selected to a certain collage and all the implications. She gives good stories and background to each example in the book.

To me, the bottom line is a call to developers, product managers, scientists (and anyone else who contribute to the creation of these systems) to take more responsibility when they building algorithms. I know it’s a real challenging aspect, as most people are not even aware to the tendencies that they got and influence their decisions. It’s also a call for the regulators to think and ask the hard questions about modern ‘AI‘ systems.

Overall, it’s a good book that is full with good stories and examples that drive her main points about the dark side of big data.

Give it a try.

You might like it as much as I did.

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