Chrome

Browsers And Their Capabilities

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The web is by far the biggest platform out there.

It’s everywhere or at least it’s on the way to be everywhere. From powerful cutting-edge devices down to devices that can do nothing more then send few bytes of information.

However, this pluralism of ways to consume this information bring a challenge to web developers. We need to understand what are the limitations and what are the capabilities of the browsers that will run our work of art.

Here are set of tools that will help you with that challenge.

Research

  • chrome status – Web platform feature support and examples. It’s a great way to see what is coming up… and try to test it today in Chrome Canary. You can also check blink-dev forum. Blink is Chromium’s rendering engine so I found some very interesting discussions.
  • status modern ie – Like Chrome Status but for Edge and Internet Explorer. It gives you the current status and the roadmap.
  • ES6 compatibility – From server side to browsers. Learn what will run and where. After all, the common technology to ‘run’ things is javascript. OK – ECMAScript, fine.
  • caniuse.com – Mobile and desktop browser capabilities.
  • what web can do today – Stuff that your browser can do, with links to demos and information about browser support.
  • mobile html5 – A table that contain features per mobile browser.
  • If you testing a new browser for its CSS3 support this tool will do the work for you – css3test.com

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Android, Business

How To Make Money From Your App?

What are the action items that will increase the odds in that battle to improve your monetization?

This is one of the most challenging aspect for every startups. After you build your application (or service) you need to measure all the actions that the users take. This is a learning mechanism that will let you iterate (hopefully quickly) and improve your product. Once you feel that you have a good product market fit and you are out of the alpha (or beta) modes it’s time to put efforts in the ‘Grow’ and ‘Earn’ parts.

Let’s see what are some of the tools that we can use.

develop, grow and earn! Continue reading

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blue in the dessert
Chrome

How To Build A Progressive Web App That Works Everywhere?

Progressive web apps are a huge opportunity for businesses. They are all about an amazing experience and make the user productive from the first visit. We wish them to be fast and reachable everywhere. I wrote in the past on ‘How to build a PWA‘ – But in this post, I will address the issues we face with the gaps in browsers. After all, this is the web and not all browsers are equal in terms of spec (ServiceWorker API) implementation. I see you smiling after the last sentence… That’s good.

There are 3 main parts that we wish to implement:

  1. Offline capabilities.
  2. Push notification.
  3. Installation.

Let’s see what can be done in each part.

Offline

This is the main feature that let us ‘feel’ more like a native app. The user can be productive everywhere, with or without a network connection.

The good news is that Chrome, Firefox, Opera and UC browser are all supporting service worker. This is the API that enables us to give our users the magic of offline capabilities. We even know that Edge will support it soon.

The (big) elephant in the room is 
What can you do about it?
Treat network as a feature, and use Web Storage API to cache content. Your web app will require network connection to load, but then treat the network as a feature. You can use AppCache. It’s a deprecated offline spec, but you can use it to buy time and give your iOS users an offline experience. Make sure you are using it only on a single page app as it got lots of ‘douchebag parts’.
Here is an example of a web app that works with app cache. I’ve created it during 2013, so please take it easy.

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Chrome

The Next Billions Users

This is a short one that is mainly compose from 3 images that tell the story of “The next billions users” and what we should focus on.

From which countries new users will come online?

internet users per country

If you wish to see more about this data. Check this Source.

What to focus on?

When you develop your fast and resilient web app, you should focus on 4 aspects:

fast and resilient web apps

How?

The client must be able to render the application regardless of their connectivity. If the user can’t load the app, nothing else is important. Offline is a normal mode of operation for resilient applications. You can do it today with the Service Worker API. It’s not only the offline feature, but the ability to control your users’ experience and improve it (e.g. push notifications).

More in Ilya’s #IO16 Talk and right here. Continue reading

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Chrome

Progressive Web Apps – Offline And Add To Home Screen

Screenshot 2015-05-13 18.04.53

Why?

Progressive Web Apps are all about an amazing experience. To me, it’s the moment you see your users happy from the quality experience you gave them.
Web apps should be useful to users from the very first visit (where it’s fast and useful even with bad connection), to the launch from a home screen or push notification. There are many good use-cases for a new web apps with these capabilities. However, think on your own site/app today and see if it can benefit from these aspects.
I think that in most cases, the answer will be: Yes Please!

How?

We needs to follow these two steps: Serve our web app over HTTPS and leverage service worker.
The third step, is in the hands of our users. It is a good reflection to our quality of work and if our web app is useful for them.
Screen Shot 2016-03-20 at 2.48.48 PM

Let’s see what are some of the good resources we have today in order to jump into the water.

Offer an offline experience

You should serve your site over HTTPs and implement Service Workers. Here are two good tutorials to show you how to implement it on a new project or a current one:

  1. Offline code lab – The famous Air Horner web app. It is extra useful during a good football game.
  2. Your first PWA – Weather web app.

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Chrome, HTML5, webdev

Accelerate your mobile pages, it’s easy!

The road to success

In October, Google announced a new open source project called Accelerated Mobile Pages, which aims to dramatically improve the performance of the mobile web.
Why it is important?
Well, one look at the history of these posts will prove you that there is a real need for speed!
The project relies on AMP HTML, a new open framework built entirely out of existing web technologies, which allows websites to build light-weight web pages.  

The basic ‘hello world’ version of your HTML page will look like: Continue reading

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Android, Chrome, mobile

Mobile Trends During 2015

Quick stats that shows why it’s a “mobile world”.
Time spend on mobile grows 117% year over year. One quick look at the image below will show that we have a new form factor that is taking all others in terms of growth.

mobile-grow-117

 

Phablets are rocking

Phablets have become the unstoppable media consumption device. What a proof? Check the quarterly form factor distribution forecast (below).
Amazing. In the next 6 quarters, we might be in a place where phablets are 60% of all mobile devices.
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